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Vintage Ski

Big M Ski Area, Manistee, Michigan.

Big M Ski Area, Manistee, Michigan.

1960 Winter Olympics, Squaw Valley. Photo by Bill Briner.

1960 Winter Olympics, Squaw Valley. Photo by Bill Briner.

Annual for the Ski Club of India, 1945-1946.
Found on this fine blog.

Annual for the Ski Club of India, 1945-1946.

Found on this fine blog.

In 1952 the Olympic Winter Games were held in Stein Eriksen’s hometown of Olso, Norway, the birthplace of modern skiing. At the age of 24 Stein was the first alpine skier from outside the Alps to earn a gold medal. Despite a near fall that would have resulted in disqualification, Stein won the gold in the men’s giant slalom by 1.9 seconds.

In 1952 the Olympic Winter Games were held in Stein Eriksen’s hometown of Olso, Norway, the birthplace of modern skiing. At the age of 24 Stein was the first alpine skier from outside the Alps to earn a gold medal. Despite a near fall that would have resulted in disqualification, Stein won the gold in the men’s giant slalom by 1.9 seconds.

Ski jumpers. Prince George, British Columbia, 1932.

Ski jumpers. Prince George, British Columbia, 1932.

Skis on a Porsche and a snowball fight. Zurs, Austria, 1956.

Skis on a Porsche and a snowball fight. Zurs, Austria, 1956.

Lyubov Kozyreva at the seventh Winter Olympic Games at Cortina, Italy, January 1956.
Lyubov Vladimirovna Kozyreva was born August 27, 1929 in the settlement of Bugry, Vsevolozhsky District, Leningrad Oblast and is a former Soviet cross-country skier who competed in the 1950s and 1960s for VSS Burevestnik.
She won four Winter Olympic medals with a gold in the 10 km (1956) and silvers in the 10 km (1960) and the 3x5 km Relay (1956, 1960). She also won the 10 km event at the Holmenkollen ski festival in 1955, becoming the first Soviet athlete to win at the Holmenkollen.
Her biggest successes were at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships where she won six medals, including four golds (10 km: 1954, 3x5 km: 1954, 1958, 1962) and two silvers (10 km: 1958, 5 km: 1962).

Lyubov Kozyreva at the seventh Winter Olympic Games at Cortina, Italy, January 1956.

Lyubov Vladimirovna Kozyreva was born August 27, 1929 in the settlement of Bugry, Vsevolozhsky District, Leningrad Oblast and is a former Soviet cross-country skier who competed in the 1950s and 1960s for VSS Burevestnik.

She won four Winter Olympic medals with a gold in the 10 km (1956) and silvers in the 10 km (1960) and the 3x5 km Relay (1956, 1960). She also won the 10 km event at the Holmenkollen ski festival in 1955, becoming the first Soviet athlete to win at the Holmenkollen.

Her biggest successes were at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships where she won six medals, including four golds (10 km: 1954, 3x5 km: 1954, 1958, 1962) and two silvers (10 km: 1958, 5 km: 1962).

"Springtime Skiers Gaze Across Volcanic Wastes to 7,515-foot Mount Ngaurhoe, an Active Crater”
Kodachrome by Howell Walker from “New Zealand, Pocket Wonder World,” National Geographic, April 1952.

"Springtime Skiers Gaze Across Volcanic Wastes to 7,515-foot Mount Ngaurhoe, an Active Crater”

Kodachrome by Howell Walker from “New Zealand, Pocket Wonder World,” National Geographic, April 1952.

Skiing in Zermatt, Switzerland with the Matterhorn in the background. Photo by Robert Capa in 1949.
An exhibition of Robert Capa’s rare color work is currently being shown at the International Center of Photography in New York City.

Skiing in Zermatt, Switzerland with the Matterhorn in the background. Photo by Robert Capa in 1949.

An exhibition of Robert Capa’s rare color work is currently being shown at the International Center of Photography in New York City.

Advertisement for the early 20th Century Minnesota ski manufacturer Northland Skis.
I found the text below here:
Northland Ski Manufacturing Company was incorporated in 1912 by Ole S. Ellevold, former foreman of the Strand Ski Company. In 1913, Norwegian born Christian A. Lund became associated with the business through purchase of stock. In 1916, Christian Lund owned most of the stock of the company and Ellevold was forced out. In the 1920s and early 1930s Northland published some of the first U.S. how-to-ski pamphlets printed in the U.S. Northland skis soon gained a widespread reputation for unsurpassed quality making Northland the largest manufacturer of skis in the world. A series of factory fires caused Northland to move to different locations over the years.In 1938, Northland opened a factory in Laconia, New Hampshire to capitalize on Eastern ski demand. The factory in Laconia was managed by Christian Lund’s son Carl. A complete line of skis, skiing accesories, hockey sticks, and toboggans were manufactured in Laconia. Abercrombie & Fitch Department Store sold skis made by Northland.Northland was forced to adopt fiberglass in the late 1960s, and became just another ski company—its product was pedestrian. And, unlike Rossignol, Kastle and Kneissl, Northland couldn’t afford to support athletes on the U.S. team, although they did sign Stein Eriksen.In October 1966, Northland was bought by Larson Industries, which built Larson and Glaspar fiberglass boats. Larson expanded rapidly into snowmobiles and other sports, and then went bankrupt. Most Larson stock was acquired by Wilson Sporting Goods in 1970 and the Larson conglomerate closed.

Advertisement for the early 20th Century Minnesota ski manufacturer Northland Skis.

I found the text below here:

Northland Ski Manufacturing Company was incorporated in 1912 by Ole S. Ellevold, former foreman of the Strand Ski Company. In 1913, Norwegian born Christian A. Lund became associated with the business through purchase of stock. In 1916, Christian Lund owned most of the stock of the company and Ellevold was forced out. In the 1920s and early 1930s Northland published some of the first U.S. how-to-ski pamphlets printed in the U.S. Northland skis soon gained a widespread reputation for unsurpassed quality making Northland the largest manufacturer of skis in the world. A series of factory fires caused Northland to move to different locations over the years.

In 1938, Northland opened a factory in Laconia, New Hampshire to capitalize on Eastern ski demand. The factory in Laconia was managed by Christian Lund’s son Carl. A complete line of skis, skiing accesories, hockey sticks, and toboggans were manufactured in Laconia. Abercrombie & Fitch Department Store sold skis made by Northland.

Northland was forced to adopt fiberglass in the late 1960s, and became just another ski company—its product was pedestrian. And, unlike Rossignol, Kastle and Kneissl, Northland couldn’t afford to support athletes on the U.S. team, although they did sign Stein Eriksen.

In October 1966, Northland was bought by Larson Industries, which built Larson and Glaspar fiberglass boats. Larson expanded rapidly into snowmobiles and other sports, and then went bankrupt. Most Larson stock was acquired by Wilson Sporting Goods in 1970 and the Larson conglomerate closed.

A “course de ski pour dames”, ski race for women, Chamonix, France, 1908.

A “course de ski pour dames”, ski race for women, Chamonix, France, 1908.

Norwegian alpine ski racer and Olympic gold medalist Stein Eriksen, circa 1950.

Norwegian alpine ski racer and Olympic gold medalist Stein Eriksen, circa 1950.

Postcard for Better’s Hill Ski Center, Saranac Lake, NY in the Adirondack Mountains.

Postcard for Better’s Hill Ski Center, Saranac Lake, NY in the Adirondack Mountains.

William Robinson, Jr., son of William M. Robinson, in 1965. More about Bill Sr. here.

William Robinson, Jr., son of William M. Robinson, in 1965. More about Bill Sr. here.